About the Nossal Institute

Our History

The Nossal Institute for Global Health is named in honour of Sir Gustav Nossal and his commitment to translating medical research into health for all. The Institute was established in 2006 to advocate for the public health of vulnerable communities.

The Nossal Institute Ltd, which was incorporated in 1998, is a company within the Institute formed to facilitate the international consultancy work of the Institute.


Our Vision

A better future for all through stronger health systems.


Our Mission

To strengthen the quality, affordability and inclusiveness of health systems in the Asia Pacific through practical research, learning and development responses to contemporary health issues.


Our Values

  • Health equity: equal access to, use of, and payment for health services and other facilities and resources, recognising the role of broad social determinants of health
  • Knowledge: being informed by and contributing to evidence based solutions
  • Sustainability: long-term advances in health systems and capacity development
  • Partnership: partnerships defined by mutual respect and understanding


Our Work

Find out more about the Nossal Institute, our work, capabilities, research units and view our infographic world map featuring our selected clients and areas of work.

Nossal Defining Statement
Nossal Defining Statement (PDF 2.7 MB)

What is Global Health?

The concept of Global Health emerged alongside the rise of ‘globalisation’ in the early 2000s. It incorporates concepts including the cultural, demographic, environmental, and socioeconomic determinants of health. Global Health could be defined as ‘… an area for study, research and practice that places a priority on improving health and achieving equity in health for all people worldwide.’ (Koplan et al 2009). Global Health is:

  • Global: it looks at health at a national and international scale, and is not confined by geographic boundaries
  • Equity-focused: it recognises there are great inequalities and injustices in health, and that addressing the drivers of social disadvantage must be a part of the solution to health problems
  • Interdisciplinary: it is concerned with health and its intersections with other sectors and disciplines such as sociology, economics, politics, engineering and education

Global Health investigates the interconnections between various countries, sectors and disciplines, by contrast, the older phrase ‘international health’ referred primarily to infectious disease in developing countries.