Yamna Taouk

The influence of psychosocial work stressors on health and mortality: A longitudinal study of working Australians

Supervisors:  

Dr Allison Milner, Centre for Health Equity, MSPGH, University of Melbourne

A/Prof Matthew Spittal, Centre for Mental Health, MSPGH, University of Melbourne

Prof Anthony LaMontagne, Centre for Population Heath Research, School of Health & Social Development, Deakin University

Title of PhD:  The influence of psychosocial work stressors on health and mortality: A longitudinal study of working Australians

Abstract:

The working environment is central in individuals’ lives, influencing health outcomes including psychological and physical wellbeing. Psychosocial job stressors are common exposures in the workplace and there is broad support regarding their adverse health consequences. Their effect on mortality involves multiple pathways; direct effects through biological and physiological processes, and indirect effects through mediating health behaviours. My research involves applying innovative statistical and epidemiological methods in examining the relationship between common psychosocial work stressors, ill-health and mortality; and the contribution of social determinants of job stressors toward explaining differences in mortality.

Bio:

Yamna Taouk is a PhD candidate with the Centre for Health Equity and is engaged in applying innovative statistical and epidemiological methods in examining the relationship between common psychosocial work stressors, ill-health and mortality. She is also currently employed as a Research Statistician in the Health and Law Unit within the Centre for Health Policy, involved in the first comprehensive study of risk factors for complaints against legal practitioners in Victoria. She is also exploring the relationship between quality of care and medico-legal risk including quantifying the risk of complaints against health practitioners in Australia. She has a particularly strong emphasis on the management and analysis of longitudinal data in social research.