Study Gender & Health and Health Inequalities

Project Details

We offer courses in gender and health, research methods and health equity. The following subjects are offered in 2017 and are part of the Masters of Public Health (MPH):

  • Health Inequalities (MPH) - Semester 2
  • Gender and Health (MPH), Semester 1

Health Inequalities

The conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work and age shape their health as does the distribution of money, power and resources at global, national and local levels.

This subject (as part of the MPH)  provides an overview of the Australian and international evidence on the ways in which social, economic and cultural processes contribute to population health.

More specifically, the subject examines relationships between health and a range of determinants of health (such as; gender, poverty, socio-economic position, housing, employment and working conditions, race/ethnicity, discrimination and place), the ways in which health inequalities are generated and how health interventions might influence population health.

The subject will be of interest to social epidemiologists, policy makers, practitioners and clinicians.

Learning objectives

At the completion of this subject, students should be able to :

  • describe the social determinants of health and health inequalities;
  • identify key conceptual frameworks applied to health inequalities research and interventions;
  • interpret the empirical evidence on the key social, economic and cultural processes that influence health; and
  • critically analyse the relationship between health and gender, poverty, socio-economic position, employment and working conditions, race/ethnicity, discrimination, housing and place.

Course Co-ordinator
Dr Allison Milner: allison.milner@unimelb.edu.au


Gender and Health

This subject will introduce sex/gender as a social construct that influences health. In the course, students are encouraged to reflect on different perspectives of gender, sex and health using biological, sociological, and cultural paradigms.  We will compare and contrast the health of men and women and critically analyse the explanations that have been offered for both the differences and similarities. Case studies will be used to illustrate the contemporary ways in which practices of health care are gendered and the consequences for health (e.g. mental health care, responses to violence). We will also analyse the ways in which public health programs are gendered and the consequences for health (e.g. screening programs, sexual and reproductive health programs etc). Finally, we will analyse the health consequences of gender relations in day-to-day life (e.g. in employment, housing, family).

Learning objectives

At the completion of this subject, students should be able to demonstrate the ability to:

  • Understand the social construction of sex/gender
  • Provide multiple perspectives to an understanding of the ways that gender and health are related
  • Apply the theories of gender to health problems
  • Apply a ‘gender lens’ to health promotion and public and social policy

Course Co-ordinator
Dr Allison Milner: allison.milner@unimelb.edu.au

Funding

Research Group

Gender and Women's Health


School Research Themes



Key Contact

For further information about this research, please contact the research group leader.

Department / Centre

Centre for Health Equity

Unit / Centre

Gender and Women's Health